Evolution: A Walk [with Herbivores] Ternate Park, Stanford

“Scented, sexy, queer…and dark”

Helen Paris, curious.com

Evolution: A Walk [with Herbivores] is a site responsive audio tour. Wearing bespoke olfactory signalling suits, audiences are lead through a ‘field guide’ of evolution from cyanobacteria to Homo sapiens. Highlighting endemic local species, recent discoveries in plant signalling, interspecies communication and a unique take on social politics, this walk enables audience to see, hear, taste and smell the inter-species communication that surrounds and reassess their own role in the hierarchy of the Eukaryotic Kingdom.

A Walk [with Herbivores] encompasses participatory actions such as inter-species sex, assisted procreation, group parenting of a painful embryo, DNA degustation, and a reclining meditation from the Voice of Plant Consciousness.  This informative live artwork combines humour with a deeply relaxing moment in nature and prompts curiosity, surprise and delight from audiences.

Conceived, written and performed by Cat Jones with sound by Melissa Hunt.

Evolution: A Walk [with Herbivores] Ternate Park, Stanford, Image by Cat Jones 2013


performance studies international 19, Stanford, USA 27 – 30 June 2013 as part of Field Suite, Transcontinental Garden Exchange along with  In the Waiting Room: Needling Clitorides Histories and Fieldwork: Empathic Limb Clinic. Sound mix by Cate Hull.

the WIRED Lab, WIRED Open Day, 3 May 2014 as part of Field Suite. Taking place in grassy woodlands country the herbivore suit was  augmented with Grey Box Gum leaves in collaboration with Red Leg Grass, Kurrajong, local crops, ants, fungi and lichen. Country Mushrooms, site responsive sound composition by Melissa Hunt. Suits created by Kate Brown. Walk accompanied by Kate Brown, Melissa Hunt and Cate Hull.

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Developed with support from the Australia Council for the Arts through a Creative Australia Fellowship 2012, residencies at fo.am, Belgium and Bundanon Trust NSW.

Special thanks to Sarah Last, the Transcontinental Garden Exchange artists Amelia Wallin, Maria White, Lisa Mumford and Leanne Thompson and to Cate Hull.